All posts filed under: Non-fiction

July wrap-up

July reading wrap-up: Julian Barnes’s 2011 Man Booker prize-winning novel The Sense of an Ending Julian Barnes’s Levels of Life “The Dead” in James Joyce’s ‘Dubliners‘ Patti Smith’s memoir Just Kids Read a bunch of long-form New Yorker stories published in the two issues that I received (July 10 & 17, 2017 Issue & July 3, 2017 Issue). Always a late delivery, unfortunately! But always an interesting read! I think the Hemingway story is my favorite. The New Yorker article titles: My Dentist’s Murder Trial Hemingway, the Sensualist Nick Kyrgios, the Reluctant Rising Star of Tennis America’s Future Is Texas July writing wrap-up: Submitted a short story to H G Wells Short Story Competition 2017 on July 12. Paid the entry fee and an additional absolutely outrageous international payment bank processing fee. Got no reply from the competition organizers. (https://hgwellscompetition.com/) Submitted a short story to HISSAC Annual Open Short Story Competition on July 26. Paid an entry-fee and an affordable online credit cards transaction fee with PayPal. Received an immediate reply email from the organizer once my online payment was made. (http://www.hissac.co.uk/CompetitionDetails) Here’s the reply email that I received …

Taiwanese artist Renren’s new book ‘Un moment français’ beautifully illustrates what French love looks like in real life

Taiwanese illustrator Renren’s new book, “Un moment français 達令的法語時間” came out this week. I wondered around the Tai-da Eslite bookstore the day before yesterday after work and found this little cheerful illustration book. I read through the preface and the author’s page and thought it was very inspiring. It said that the book author and illustrator Renren had once been an English language teacher for little kids and a purchasing sales for computer companies. Encouraged by his fine arts trained French husband, she began to pursue her dream career as a freelance book illustrator. For thirty years she dreamed of one day holding her own drawings but never pursued it. The author’s introduction noted that she made the career change in her late thirties, which I think is quite inspiring. Renren has worked on many illustration projects on books since then. A list of links: Buy the book on books.com.tw: “Un moment français 達令的法語時間” by Renren Renren’s blog: http://letslearnfrench-ren.blogspot.tw/ Renren ‘s facebook page: https://zh-tw.facebook.com/UnMomentFrancaisDeRenRen/

On Dr. Tze-lung Chen’s New Book The Group’s Corporate Governance and Prevention of Financial Crime

Will Taiwan ever get serious about corporate governance? The Financial Supervisory Commission announced on June 19 that it is dismissing Ho Shou-chuan as chairman and board director of Sinopac for the current detention for suspected violations of corporate governance rules. Is this just another example of how Taiwan has a long way to go before Taiwan’s corporate governance is up to snuff? FSC criticized for too slow to respond to Sinopac scandal According to a report, the FSC listed 4 and 6 major wrongdoings committed by SinoPac and its staff, respectively. However, the FSC only issued a “correction” to Sinopac, which was constantly being criticized as too lenient and an abdication of the FSC’s responsibility. NPP Legislators Huang Kuo-chang recently criticized Lee Ruey-tsang Chair of the FSC for being too slow to act and unwilling to respond.  He also slammed the FSC for not holding Sinopac’s independent directors and supervisors accountable. Deficiencies of Corporate Governance in Taiwan In his latest book “The Group’s Corporate Governance and Prevention of Financial Crime”, Dr. Tze-lung Chen, Director of the European Union …

Taiwan’s Looming Pension Crisis: A Review of Hao Chung-jen’s ‘Taiwan Inc Bankruptcy’

A new book calls on the Taiwanese government to undertake pension reform as warning signs indicate that Taiwan could face problems similar to those experienced by Greece This article was first published online by Thinking Taiwan想想論壇(http://thinking-taiwan.com) on March 30, 2016. In his latest book 《中華民國股份有限公司破產》(Taiwan Inc Bankruptcy), Hao Chung-jen (郝充仁), a professor at Tamkang University, takes a close look at the impact of what he describes as Taiwan’s ill-designed pensions system and the barriers that have hindered progress in pension reform. The book emphasizes the urgency of pension system reform through a business metaphor: If the Taiwanese government were a company, you would be terrified to discover how little its earnings are. Hao is adamant that the pension system has serious flaws, but he believes that it can change. The opening chapters provide a brief history of Taiwan’s pension system and analyze how demographic structure changes have affected that system. The section goes all the way back to 1949, when people from China poured into Taiwan and when the government decided to give outrageously high pensions …

Best Quotes by Julian Barnes

Julian Patrick Barnes (born 19 January 1946) is an English writer. Barnes won the Man Booker Prize for his book The Sense of an Ending (2011), and three of his earlier books had been shortlisted for the Booker Prize: Flaubert’s Parrot (1984), England, England (1998), and Arthur & George (2005). He has also written crime fiction under the pseudonym Dan Kavanagh. In addition to novels, Barnes has published collections of essays and short stories. Here are a few great quotes from Julian Barnes’s publications. When you read a great book, you don’t escape from life, you plunge deeper into it. There may be a superficial escape – into different countries, mores, speech patterns – but what you are essentially doing is furthering your understanding of life’s subtleties, paradoxes, joys, pains and truths. Reading and life are not separate but symbiotic. JULIAN BARNES, A Life with Books Reading is a majority skill but a minority art. Yet nothing can replace the exact, complicated, subtle communion between absent author and entranced, present reader. JULIAN BARNES, A Life with …

2017 Summer Reading List

I admire those authors, editors and journalists who manage to do their work while reading a phenomenal number of books, about and beyond their latest project. I secretly hope that I can trick myself to read at half that speed. This year I aim to step outside of my comfort zone with these six picks. Here is a list of fiction and nonfiction books that I am planning to read this summer: Levels of Life by Julian Barnes Catch-22 by Joseph Heller Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov The Man Without a Shadow: A Novel by Joyce Carol Oates American Gods by Neil Gaiman Just Kids by Patti Smith   The book that I’m currently reading is Man Booker Prize winner Julian Barnes’s new book “Levels of Life,” published in 2013. It is a small collection of essay, fiction and heartbreaking memoir. The first section, “The Sin of Height,” is a historical essay that revolves around the “aerostatic photographs” of Paris taken in 1858 by the French balloonist Nadar. I’m reading stories about 19th-century ballooning enthusiasts for the …

10 of the best books set in New York

Inspired by “The Best New York City Novels by Neighborhood,” a great article from The New York Public Library Official website, I came up with a list of recommended books for readers who would like to read stories set in New York. Here are some of my favorite books set in New York. “Washington Square” by Henry James (1880) “The Age of Innocence” by Edith Wharton (1920) “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1925) “The Catcher in the Rye” by J.D. Salinger (1951) “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” by Truman Capote (1958) “Jazz” Toni Morrison (1992) “Broke Heart Blues” by Joyce Carol Oates (1999) “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close” by Jonathan Safran Foer (2005) “Brooklyn” by Colm Tóibín (2009) “Just Kids” by Patti Smith (2010)