All posts filed under: Writing

July wrap-up

July reading wrap-up: Julian Barnes’s 2011 Man Booker prize-winning novel The Sense of an Ending Julian Barnes’s Levels of Life “The Dead” in James Joyce’s ‘Dubliners‘ Patti Smith’s memoir Just Kids Read a bunch of long-form New Yorker stories published in the two issues that I received (July 10 & 17, 2017 Issue & July 3, 2017 Issue). Always a late delivery, unfortunately! But always an interesting read! I think the Hemingway story is my favorite. The New Yorker article titles: My Dentist’s Murder Trial Hemingway, the Sensualist Nick Kyrgios, the Reluctant Rising Star of Tennis America’s Future Is Texas July writing wrap-up: Submitted a short story to H G Wells Short Story Competition 2017 on July 12. Paid the entry fee and an additional absolutely outrageous international payment bank processing fee. Got no reply from the competition organizers. (https://hgwellscompetition.com/) Submitted a short story to HISSAC Annual Open Short Story Competition on July 26. Paid an entry-fee and an affordable online credit cards transaction fee with PayPal. Received an immediate reply email from the organizer once my online payment was made. (http://www.hissac.co.uk/CompetitionDetails) Here’s the reply email that I received …

7 Short Story Competitions for 2017

2017 HG Wells Short Story Competition Deadline: Sunday 16 July 2017 The length is 1,500 to 5,000 words The Seán Ó Faoláin Short Story Competition Deadline: 31st July 2017. 3,000 words or fewer. The Writer Contest: Let There Be Light Deadline: August 21st, 2017 Word count: 2,000 words or less The Willesden Herald New Short Stories Competition 2017 Deadline: August 31st, 2017 The word limit this year is 7,500. 2017 The Short Story Competition Word limit: 1,000-5,000 Deadline: September 15th, 2017 Earlyworks Press Short Story Competition Stories up to 4000 words Deadline: 31st October 2017 The Fish Short Story Prize Word Limit: 5,000 words Deadline: 30 November 2017

How long does it take you to read The New Yorker cover to cover?

I just received an issue of The New Yorker at my office this morning. It was a late delivery, as usual. I was thrilled to get the copy buy was not too thrilled to see another cover illustration of President Trump. The editors need to stop making Trump cover illustrations for the magazine. I’m tried of seeing him so frequently on a legendary magazine. The blog post’s feature image is the issue that I received today. I saw several interesting website articles about The New Yorker, and one of them was from the Wall Street Journal. According to the report, “The New Yorker’s print and digital subscriptions rose 2.5% to 1.04 million in the second half of 2015, according to the Alliance for Audited Media, including 88,000 paid digital subscriptions.” According to an annual report on American journalism, the median age of readers of The New Yorker is about 51. A website discussion post talked about the time frame for reading The New Yorker magazine,  which I’m eager to find out myself. A similar question on the average hours for reading an …

Best Quotes by Julian Barnes

Julian Patrick Barnes (born 19 January 1946) is an English writer. Barnes won the Man Booker Prize for his book The Sense of an Ending (2011), and three of his earlier books had been shortlisted for the Booker Prize: Flaubert’s Parrot (1984), England, England (1998), and Arthur & George (2005). He has also written crime fiction under the pseudonym Dan Kavanagh. In addition to novels, Barnes has published collections of essays and short stories. Here are a few great quotes from Julian Barnes’s publications. When you read a great book, you don’t escape from life, you plunge deeper into it. There may be a superficial escape – into different countries, mores, speech patterns – but what you are essentially doing is furthering your understanding of life’s subtleties, paradoxes, joys, pains and truths. Reading and life are not separate but symbiotic. JULIAN BARNES, A Life with Books Reading is a majority skill but a minority art. Yet nothing can replace the exact, complicated, subtle communion between absent author and entranced, present reader. JULIAN BARNES, A Life with …

Of Bicycles and War: A Review of Wu Ming-yi’s ‘The Stolen Bicycle’

The latest novel by the award-winning Taiwanese author interlaces devastating events with a touch of tenderness This article was first published online by Thinking Taiwan 想想論壇 (http://thinking-taiwan.com) on December 1, 2015. Wu Ming-yi’s (吳明益) fifth novel《單車失竊記》(The Stolen Bicycle) pays tribute to the millions of soldiers who died during World War II and the countless animals and natural habitats that were destroyed in the cataclysm. Written in traditional Chinese, the novel follows the protagonist as he sets off on a search for his father’s stolen bicycle, a popular Made-in-Taiwan Happiness Brand bicycle (the brand used the slogan “Get on a Happiness, Bike Your Way to Happiness” (騎幸福牌腳踏車,踏上幸福之路). The unnamed middle-age male protagonist, a writer like Wu himself, whose father is a skilled tailor at the Chung Hwa Market, receives a letter from a reader asking what happens to the father’s bicycle left at Taipei Zhongshan Hall in his last novel,《睡眠的航線》(Route in a Dream). The letter immediately grips the protagonist’s heart and he embarks on a journey of discovery, tracing back the history of the Happiness bicycles …

Reading F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Stories with Sandee Woodside

This month I signed up an interesting small tutor-led class, “The Great Gatsby and New York,” on a new Taipei English course shopping website called MDT. It was the most interesting classes on the list, and it was the only class that was about F. Scott Fitzgerald’s works. I’m a big fan of F. Scott Fitzgerald and so my thoughts are completely biased. When I saw the course description, I liked it immediately and was excited about the class. I wonder what it might be like to chat about Fitzgerald’s stories with real people in real life. “The Great Gatsby and New York” class that I attended was held every Wednesday night in the month of June (3 lessons in total) after work from 7:30pm to 9pm in a small meeting room inside an old office building nearby Guting MRT station in Taipei city. The location was great for all of us and was close to National Taiwan University and National Taiwan Normal University. The class was led by Ms. Sandee Woodside, a thirty year old writer, poet, and teacher from New …

A “How We Met” Story

Key words: Taiwan’s First Data Science Conference in August 2014, a chilling Julia Roberts film, a Taipei.py meetup talk on TensorFlow.     Liang and I met at the first data science conference ever held in Taiwan late August in the summer of 2014. There was this workshop session where very few women showed up that day, and Liang thought I might need a little guidance installing digital tools with my computer. He laughed when he found out that I didn’t even have a computer with me. I was a blogger and brought only my Media pass, small camera, cell phone and notebooks. This is Liang’s version for the first time we met. I myself could not remember anything. I remember meeting Liang, and a bunch of other guys at the conference, but I don’t remember any of our first encounter experience. I do remember spending lunchtime with him at the conference though.    Then we started to chat on and off online via Facebook messages. I could tell he was very curious about me because …